Biography

Marietta Wetherill

$24.95

First published in 1992 and now available only from the University of New Mexico Press, this is a first-hand account of life at a famous archaeological ruin. Married to Richard Wetherill, the rancher and amateur archaeologist who ran a trading post in Chaco Canyon from 1896 until he was murdered by a Navajo in 1910, Marietta Wetherill got to know her Navajo neighbours as intimately as an Anglo could. While Richard was excavating at Pueblo Bonito, Marietta managed the trading post. She befriended a singer who adopted her into his clan and gave her a close-up view of Navajo medicine and religion.

Publication Date: 
1997-09-01

Photographing Mesa Verde

$17.95

Fifteen years before Mesa Verde became a national park, a young Swedish scientist explored and photographed its landscape and cultural sites. Clambering up and down sheer cliffs while hauling heavy, cumbersome equipment, Gustaf Nordenskiöld produced vivid images. Publication of his comprehensive study of the ancient ruins the following year brought worldwide attention to the area.  

For the centennial year of Nordenskiöld’s work, two couples carefully recreated his photographs. The resultant images contrast the natural and human-inflicted damages of centuries with the stabilized structures visible today. Photographing Mesa Verde presents those images along with a fascinating narrative about Nordenskiöld’s work at Mesa Verde.

Fifteen years before Mesa Verde became a national park, a young Swedish scientist explored and photographed its landscape and cultural sites. Clambering up and down sheer cliffs while hauling heavy, cumbersome equipment. Gustaf Nordenskiold produced vivid images. Publication of his comprehensive study of the ancient ruins the following year brought worldwide attention to the area. For the centennial year of Nordenskiold's work, two couples fully recreated his photographs. The resultant images contrast the natural and human-inflicted damages of centuries with the stabilized structures visible today. Photographing Mesa Verde presents those images along with a fascinating narrative about Nordenskiold's work at Mesa Verde.

Publication Date: 
2006-01-01

Richard Wetherill Anasazi

$24.95

Anasazi, the Navajos' name for the "Ancient Ones" who preceded them into the Southwest, is the nickname of Richard Wetherill, who devoted his life to a search for remains of these vanished peoples. He discovered the cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde and Kiet Siel and the Basket Maker sites at Grand Gulch, Utah, and at Chaco Canyon he initiated the excavation of Pueblo Bonito, the largest prehistoric ruin in the United States. His discoveries are among the most important ever made by an American archaeologist.

Publication Date: 
1974-04-01

Wetherills Friends of Mesa Verde

$17.95

Following in the wake of what one noted scientist called “transients who neither revered nor cared for the ruins as symbols of the past,” the Wetherill family became the earliest students of Mesa Verde. Their careful excavations and record-keeping helped preserve key information, leading to a deeper understanding of the people who built and occupied the cliff dwellings. As devout Quakers, they felt they were predestined to protect the prehistoric sites from wanton destruction – a role that would not be assumed by the government or other major institutions until years later. Based on decades of meticulous research, author Fred Blackburn sets the record straight on these early protectors of Mesa Verde.

Following in the wake of what one noted scientist called 'transients who neither revered nor cared for the ruins as symbols of the past, ' the Wetherill family became the earliest students of Mesa Verde. Their careful excavations and record-keeping helped preserve key information, leading to a deeper understanding of the people who built and occupied the cliff dwellings. As devout Quakers, they felt they were predestined to protect the historic sites from wanton destruction - a role that would not be assumed by the government or other institutions until years later. Based on decades of meticulous research, author Fred Blackburn sets the record straight on these early protectors of Mesa Verde.

Publication Date: 
2006-01-01